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Friday, December 9, 2016

How Best to Handle Friends with Health Issues

Dear Bro Jo,

Hi Bro Jo,

I have a girlfriend that really wants me to go and see a movie with just her and she has health problems and I don't want to go because I don't feel comfortable being with her because if she would start feeling bad I won't know what to do.

So how can I tell her nicely that I can't go with just her to see a movie.

Please help me.

From,

- Name Withheld




Dear NW,

I say this with love . . .

Grow up and be a better friend.


Look, if you're afraid that something might happen and you won't know what to do, ask her beforehand.  Simply say "I'd love to go; is there anything I need to know, you know, should something happen?"

You'll get some education.  She'll be glad that you care enough to ask.  And you'll both enjoy a lovely time.


- Bro Jo

2 comments:

Laura said...

She is so much more than whatever health issues she has. You can help her feel that way by treating her the way you should treat any dear friend. And more importantly, when you treat her as a friend you will realize it for yourself that she is much more than whatever ails her mortal body.

Anonymous said...

Reading this broke my heart, as I have health problems myself. People are more than their limitations. Just ask her what you should do if her bad health comes into play. That's what I would want. I have epilepsy and I don't understand why people are afraid to be around me. I just like to know I am being supported.